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Kasim Flowers
Kasim Flowers

Fast Tract Digestion IBS


DrNR: I really think this idea of less is more is kind of where I start from. So I like to keep things simple. And that goes back to my original observations that my acid reflux went away on a low carb diet, done. Now, the fast tract diet really focuses on just the hard to digest carbohydrates because those are the most likely to not be fully digested and persist in the small intestine feeding blooms of bacteria.




Fast Tract Digestion IBS



Those are the exact five carbohydrates that the fast tract diet targeted. And that went back to a discussion I had with Dr. Mike Eades about protein power. He was giving me some advise on this low carb approach. He had written about heartburn and carbs. He was a co-author of that book with his wife Mary Dan Eades. And he got me started on which carbs are the worst. And it turns out that the list that we came up and targeted in the fast tract diet was the same exact list in this textbook.


Let me add just one more thing. So in addition to actually restricting these fermentable carbs a little bit, limiting those, putting our microbes on a diet, so to speak, the other piece is to modulate behaviors that are pro-digestion. So it means that more of your food will be digested and less of it will persist, again, driving these symptoms. So behaviors, the food.


Gentle exercise can help support healthy digestion. Being upright and active allows gravity to help move food through the digestive system. For example, a slow walk around the block may ease bloating and reduce feelings of fullness.


Bacteria occur naturally in the gut. Some help digest food, but others can cause problems with digestion if they are too abundant in the body. Fermented foods contain bacteria that may help support a healthy digestive system.


The most common cause of stomach pain and bloating is excess intestinal gas. If you get a bloated stomach after eating, it may be a digestive issue. It might be as simple as eating too much too fast, or you could have a food intolerance or other condition that causes gas and digestive contents to build up. Your menstrual cycle is another common cause of temporary bloating. Sometimes a bloated stomach can indicate a more serious medical condition.


Gas is a natural byproduct of digestion, but too much intestinal gas means your digestion is gone awry. While you can ingest gasses by swallowing air or drinking carbonated beverages, these gasses mostly escape through belching before they reach your intestines. Gasses in your intestines are mostly produced by gut bacteria digesting carbohydrates, in a process called fermentation.


These can include solids, liquids, and gas. Digestive contents can build up in your digestive system when there is a backup or restriction in your digestive tract or when the muscles that move digestive contents along are somehow impaired. Any build-up of digestive contents along the digestive tract will leave less room for normal amounts of gas to process through. It also leaves less room for other things in your abdomen, including circulatory fluids and fat, making everything feel tighter. Causes of build-up can include:


Are your off again, on again, bathroom habits affecting your daily life? If so, you may have Irritable Bowel Syndrome, or IBS. IBS is a problem that causes abdominal pain, cramping, and changes in your bowel movements. IBS is known as a functional bowel disorder, and is not considered a disease. What I mean by that, is when a doctor passes a colonoscope into the colon to look around, everything may look perfectly normal - but yet, Your colon may not be not be acting normal at all! Symptoms of IBS can range from mild to severe. The main symptoms are diarrhea, constipation, or both. And you will probably experience abdominal pain, bloating, and gas. These symptoms often will temporarily improve after having a bowel movement, and that instant relief of course feels good. But, the important thing to understand is that the root of the problem often isn't here (abdomen), its here (head). IBS is a classic example of your mind affecting your bowels. It's rarely seen in folks who are not stressed, anxious, or depressed. It's often hard to determine why people get IBS. It has been found that IBS is twice as common in women as it is in men, and can develop at any age, but most get it as teenagers or in early adulthood. Diet can also cause IBS. Foods that often cause IBS symptoms are Fatty foods, such as French fries, or any drink containing caffeine like coffee and tea. One great idea is to keep a Food Diary. Write down what you're eating and when, and include the symptoms you experience after you eat. This information can be helpful to your doctor in identifying if you have IBS.The way most doctors diagnose IBS is by gathering your history and ruling out other things like lactose intolerance, gluten intolerance or some sort of bowel infection. Your doctor might recommend a colonoscopy just to make sure the colon looks okay. But remember, there is no specific test to diagnose IBS. So, how do you manage IBS? For some people, symptoms can reduce their ability to work, travel, and attend social events, and some may have to deal with IBS the rest of their life. There are several ways to manage your IBS. Large meals can make your symptoms worse. Try eating 4 to 5 smaller meals per day. Extra Fiber can bulk up your stools to help with diarrhea or help draw in extra water to help with constipation. Laxatives can help with difficult constipation. Drugs like Hyoscyamine help to calm down an overactive digestive tract. Lastly, since stress, depression and anxiety can fuel IBS, work on ways to relax. Perhaps, try exercise, meditation or yoga - and if that doesn't work, consider trying an antidepressant drug to help improve your mood. Oh, and keep in mind that blood in your stool or significant weight loss are not part of IBS, so be sure to let your doctor know if that ever shows up. Remember that the mind and the body are interconnected. You can't expect to feel good here (head), without feeling good down here (abdomen), and vice versa.


The intestine is connected to the brain using hormone and nerve signals that go back and forth between the bowel and the brain. These signals affect bowel function and symptoms. The nerves can become more active during stress. This can cause the intestines to be more sensitive and contract more.


What do you know about your digestive tract bacteria? Normally, a wide range of bacteria helps us digest our food and works together to keep us healthy. But when infections or antibiotics intervene, the variety of beneficial bacteria drops and undesirable strains like Clostridium difficile can gain the upper hand.


Could probiotics help? These beneficial bacteria could help shape the ecology of the intestinal tract. The result should be a better intestinal microbiome, and fewer symptoms of indigestion. Should you be taking probiotics and prebiotics? What about the foods that feed healthy digestive tract bacteria?


For one, caffeine is a stimulant that increases gut motility, or the contraction of the muscles that propel contents in the gastrointestinal tract. This stimulating effect may lead to loose stools or diarrhea, which can contribute to dehydration. Caffeine may also act as a mild diuretic, meaning it can increase urine output. Additionally, it can increase jitteriness, anxiety and the inability to sleep well, with stress and anxiety often worsening symptoms of many gastrointestinal conditions, including Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS) and Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD).


Although the U.S. Food and Drug Administration recommends only allowing yourself 400 milligrams of caffeine a day, there's a wide variation in both how sensitive people are to the effects of caffeine and how fast their bodies metabolize it. For reference, some of the popular, small, two-ounce sized "shots" contain up to 200 milligrams of caffeine within that small container alone. Excessive consumption of energy drinks can acutely cause caffeine intoxication, resulting in tachycardia (fast heart rate), vomiting, cardiac arrhythmias, seizures, and even death, in some people.


If you have IBS or IBD, excess amounts of refined sugar at one time may lead to GI distress since the sugar may not absorb well into your intestines. When this happens, the GI tract draws water into the bowel to dilute and flush out excess sugar, which can lead to more unwanted, an unexpected, bathroom runs.


Once you chew and swallow your food, the remaining actions in the digestive process are involuntarily powered by peristalsis, a powerful and continuous contraction of the muscles along your digestive tract.


McRorie JW Jr, McKeown NM. Understanding the physics of functional fibers in the gastrointestinal tract: An evidence-based approach to resolving enduring misconceptions about insoluble and soluble fiber. J Acad Nutr Diet. 2017;117(2):251-264. doi:10.1016/j.jand.2016.09.021


Gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding is a symptom of a disorder in your digestive tract. The blood often appears in stool or vomit but isn't always visible, though it may cause the stool to look black or tarry. The level of bleeding can range from mild to severe and can be life-threatening.


IBS is due to some unknown pathology that causes the digestive tract mucosa to become hypersensitive to ordinary food. The resulting mucosal changes lead to indigestion and bacterial proliferation, with the production of several toxins that further aggravate the symptoms.


Adding fiber to your diet allows for food to move quickly and easily through your digestive tract. A high fiber diet may reduce the risk of obesity, heart disease, and diabetes. Women should get 21 to 25 grams of fiber a day. Men should get 30 to 38 grams each day.


Many foods can trigger your IBS. These foods either stimulate or irritate the gastrointestinal tract, which can cause constipation, diarrhea, bloating, gas, and pain. These include foods that are high in fat, caffeine, carbonation, alcohol, and insoluble fiber, like: 041b061a72


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